The Read-Write Matrix

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The read-write matrix of Web 2.0 tools for learning

Read-write-matrix.png

The horizontal axis shows who can read the published documents, the vertical axis who can write to them. In each case the mid-point (ie where the axes cross) relates to the group of peers - eg learners within a single course. A wider group (ie between the mid-point and the 'world') could include members of a broader community of practice, or the local community or family/whanau.

The plotted points could be exemplified by:

  1. A personal reflective journal with no audience
  2. A personal wiki or blog which other learners can read
  3. A personal wiki or blog which a wider group can read
  4. A personal wiki or blog which is publicly available on the web
  5. A collaborative wiki for a sub-group of learners
  6. A collaborative wiki for the course
  7. A collaborative wiki for the course which a wider group can read
  8. A collaborative wiki for the course which is publicly available
  9. A collaborative wiki for learners and a wider group
  10. A collaborative wiki which is fully open - publicly readable and writable. Example: JB Murray's Latin American Literature project

Note: These are typical examples only - the matrix is intended to relate to other tools in addition to blogs and wikis.

Related blog post

Extending the read-write matrix

Wikis in Moodle and the read-write matrix

View presentation (Google Docs)


Citation: Left, Paul. The Read-Write Matrix. http://www.verso.co.nz/mw/index.php?title=The_Read-Write_Matrix

References

Leslie, S. Some Uses of Blogs in Education.